Television show bias on guns and suicide

Larry Elder Wins Calif. Ballot Lawsuit; Pelosi Rejects 2 GOP Picks for Jan. 6 Panel | Video: 19 Minutes 22 Seconds

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Bannon’s War Room | Morning Edition Hour 1 | Recorded July 22, 2021 | Video: 48 Minutes 25 Seconds

Episode 1,114 – Media is Covering for Fumbling Joe Biden. Police stand down during the Mi capitol storming, and Google whistle blower exposes them for acting as a foreign intelligence propaganda outlet. Guests are: Jack Posobiec, Darren Beattie, Zach Vorhies.

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Bannon’s War Room | Morning Edition Hour 2 | Recorded July 22, 2021 | Video: 48 Minutes 16 Seconds

Episode 1,115 – We Have Enough Data to Decertify. Mike Lindell has replacement coming for compromised voting machines and MAGA congressional candidate promises for be a firewall in DC. Guests are: Jack Posobiec, Wendy Rogers, Mike Lindell, Karoline Leavitt, Josh Mandel.

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Bannon’s War Room | Evening Edition | Recorded July 22, 2021 | Video: 48 Minutes 58 Seconds

Episode 1,116 – Government Has Metastasized Into A Dictatorship Robbing Us Of Liberties And Freedom. Guests are: Jack Posobiec, Natalie Winters, Raymond Ibrahim, Deena Hackett, Dr. Robert Malone.

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Biden Education Department Says It Was an ‘Error’ to Push CRT Activist Handbook

The Biden administration says that it was a mistake to promote an activist handbook that included critical race theory (CRT) in schools.

“The Department does not endorse the recommendations of this group, nor do they reflect our policy positions,” the Department of Education (DOE) said in a statement, referring to a book from the Abolitionist Teaching Network called “Guide for Racial Justice & Abolitionist Social and Emotional Learning.”

“It was an error in a lengthy document to include this citation.”

The Abolitionist Teaching Network’s Twitter account, which uses jargon that’s heavily used by CRT proponents or individuals within the “antiracist” movement, describes itself as an activist group that promotes “liberation” for “Black, Brown, and Indigenous folx, inclusive of all intersecting identities.”

The group also calls (pdf) on educators to “remove all punitive or disciplinary practices that spirit murder Black, Brown, and Indigenous children” and to “build a school culture that engages in healing and advocacy.” It doesn’t offer an explanation about how certain forms of disciplinary practices “spirit murder” the aforementioned minority groups.

The group’s handbook also states that social and emotional learning is a “covert form of policing used to punish, criminalize, and control Black, Brown, and Indigenous children and communities to adhere to White norms.”

The group doesn’t make any specific mentions of CRT on its website, but it uses many terms and ideas from the ideology—including that U.S. institutions are inherently racist. A number of Republican-led states have signed executive orders or have approved legislation prohibiting curriculum that claims the United States was founded on racist principles or that any groups—namely white people—are inherently racist.

In recent years, CRT has become somewhat of a catchall term used to describe the “antiracist” movement and training or instruction around “diversity, equity, and inclusion.”

Opponents of the theory say that it’s an outgrowth of the European Marxist critical theory school, which itself drew on the writings of Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, and others. . . . .

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Gates and Soros-backed organization buys U.K. Covid-19 testing company for $41 million

The U.K.-based maker of Covid-19 tests, Mologic, has been bought out by Global Access Health, a new Bill Gates and George Soros-backed consortium.

George Soros’ Open Society Foundation confirmed the deal on Monday in a statement, which says Global Access Health members will invest ‘at least’ $41 million into the project.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is also behind the initiative led by the Soros Economic Development Fund.

Mologic was founded in 2003 and has previously worked with the Gates Foundation. . . .

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Wireless Radiation Exposure for Children Should Be ‘Hundreds of Times Lower’ than FCC Limits, Environmental Group Says

A peer-reviewed study by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) recommends stringent health-based exposure standards for both children and adults for radiofrequency radiation emitted from wireless devices. EWG’s children’s guideline is the first of its kind and fills a gap left by federal regulators.

The study, published in the journal Environmental Health, relies on the methodology developed by the Environmental Protection Agency to assess human health risks arising from toxic chemical exposures. EWG scientists have applied the same methods to radiofrequency radiation from wireless devices, including cellphones and tablets.

EWG recommends the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) adjust its woefully outdated health standards for wireless radiation, last revised a quarter-century ago, well before wireless devices became ubiquitous, heavily used appliances synonymous with modern life.

The recommendation draws on data from a landmark 2018 study from the National Toxicology Program, or NTP, one of the largest long-term studies on the health effects of radiofrequency radiation exposure.

EWG’s new guidelines, the first developed in the U.S. to focus on children’s health, recommend that children’s exposure overall be 200 to 400 times lower than the whole-body exposure limit set by the FCC in 1996.

The EWG recommended limit for so-called whole-body Specific Absorption Rate, or SAR, for children is 0.2 to 0.4 milliwatts per kilogram, or mW/kg. For adults, EWG recommends a whole-body SAR limit of 2 to 4 mW/kg, which is 20 to 40 times lower than the federal limit.

The FCC has not set a separate standard for children. Its standards for radiofrequency radiation set a maximum SAR of 0.08 watts per kilogram, or W/kg, for whole-body exposure and an SAR for localized spatial peak — the highest exposure level for a specific part of the body, such as the brain — of 1.6 W/kg for the general population.

The NTP studies examined the health effects of 2G and 3G wireless radiation and found there is “clear evidence” of a link between exposure to radiofrequency radiation and heart tumors in laboratory animals. Similar results were reported by a team of Italian scientists from the Ramazzini Institute.

Cellphone radiation was classified a “possible carcinogen” in 2011 by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, part of the World Health Organization, a conclusion based on human epidemiological studies that found an increased risk of glioma, a malignant brain cancer, associated with cellphone use.

EWG scientists say that more research is needed on the health impacts of the latest generation of communication technologies, such as 5G. In the meantime, EWG’s recommendation is for strict, lower exposure limits for all radiofrequency sources, especially for children. . . .

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Harvey Weinstein pleads not guilty to sexual assault charges in LA court

Harvey Weinstein pleaded not guilty to a slew of sex-crime charges Wednesday during his first appearance in court in California, where he will stand trial on the new round of allegations.

The 69-year-old convicted rapist was rolled into a Los Angeles courtroom in a wheelchair, dressed in a brown jail jumpsuit and face mask, for his arraignment on an indictment charging him with 11 sexual assault counts, including four counts of rape.

Defense attorney Mark Werksman entered the plea, and Weinstein spoke only to say “thank you” to Judge Sergio Tapia, who wished him good luck as the hearing ended.

The disgraced producer is already serving a 23-year sentence for rape and sexual assault following his conviction in Manhattan in February 2020.

On Tuesday, he was whisked away from the Wende Correctional Facility in upstate New York and booked into a downtown LA jail — ending a lengthy fight to stop his extradition to the Golden State. . . .

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Eliminating virus risk at Tokyo Olympics is impossible, WHO leader says

“The mark of success is making sure that any cases are identified, isolated, traced and cared for as quickly as possible and onward transmission is interrupted,” WHO director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said.
“The mark of success is making sure that any cases are identified, isolated, traced and cared for as quickly as possible and onward transmission is interrupted,” WHO director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said. | Laurent Gillieron/Keystone via AP

How infections are handled is what matters most, WHO director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a speech to an International Olympic Committee meeting.

TOKYO — The Tokyo Olympics should not be judged by the tally of COVID-19 cases that arise because eliminating risk is impossible, the head of the World Health Organization told sports officials Wednesday as events began in Japan.

How infections are handled is what matters most, WHO director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a speech to an International Olympic Committee meeting.

“The mark of success is making sure that any cases are identified, isolated, traced and cared for as quickly as possible and onward transmission is interrupted,” he said.

The number of Games-linked COVID-19 cases in Japan this month was 79 on Wednesday, with more international athletes testing positive at home and unable to travel.

“The mark of success in the coming fortnight is not zero cases,” Tedros said, noting the athletes who already tested positive in Japan, including at the athletes village in Tokyo Bay, where most of the 11,000 competitors will stay.

Teammates classed as close contacts of infected athletes can continue training and preparing for events under a regime of isolation and extra monitoring.

Health experts in Japan have warned of the Olympics becoming a “super-spreader” event bringing tens of thousands of athletes, officials and workers during a local state of emergency.

“There is no zero risk in life,” said Tedros, who began his keynote speech minutes after the first softball game began in Fukushima, and added Japan was “giving courage to the whole world.”

The WHO leader also had a more critical message and a challenge for leaders of richer countries about sharing vaccines more fairly in the world.

“The pandemic is a test and the world is failing,” Tedros said, predicting more than 100,000 deaths from COVID-19 worldwide before the Olympic flame goes out in Tokyo on Aug. 8.

It was a “horrifying injustice,” he said, that 75% of the vaccine shots delivered globally so far were in only 10 countries.

Tedros warned anyone who believed the pandemic was over because it was under control in their part of the world lived in “a fool’s paradise.”

The world needs to produce 11 billion doses next year and the WHO wanted governments to help reach a target of vaccinating 70% of people in every country by the middle of next year.

“The pandemic will end when the world chooses to end it,” Tedros said. “It is in our hands.” . . . .

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Drug Distributors and J.& J. Announce $26 Billion Deal to End Opioids Lawsuits

After nearly two years of wrangling, the country’s three major drug distributors and a pharmaceutical giant have reached a $26 billion deal with states that would release some of the biggest companies in the industry from all legal liability in the opioid epidemic, a decades-long public health crisis that has killed hundreds of thousands of Americans.

The agreement, announced Wednesday afternoon by a bipartisan group of state attorneys general, lays the framework for billions of dollars to begin flowing into communities across the country for addiction treatment, prevention services and other steep expenses from the epidemic.

If the agreement is finalized, thousands of local governments as well as states would drop lawsuits against the companies and also pledge not to bring any future action.

The deal comes as the addiction crisis is worsening. Overdose deaths from opioids hit a record high in 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported earlier this month, a rise driven partly by the isolation and shutdown of services during the coronavirus pandemic. In all, more than 500,000 have died from overdoses to prescription and illegal street opioids since 1999, according to federal data.

“The urgency of the problem continues,” said Attorney General Herbert H. Slatery III of Tennessee at the news conference announcing the deal. “It’s just relentless.” Tennessee, whose own spike in opioid deaths was particularly sharp in 2020, could receive more than $500 million if the agreement is finalized.

The four companies that would be bound by the settlement — Johnson & Johnson and the drug distributors Cardinal Health, AmerisourceBergen and McKesson — are widely seen as having some of the deepest pockets among the corporate opioid defendants and this agreement was eagerly anticipated as a major pillar in the national litigation.

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